My Booklist

  • The book list provided below is a good resource for you when doing research for homework assignments or specific class topics. The books are organized by groups for easy reference. Simply click on the book title link to view additional information.

Children's Book

  • A Porcupine Named Fluffy

    by Helen Lester Year Published: Average
    A Porcupine Named Fluffy is a delightful tale of a young porcupine who wants to live up to his name. Fluffy's parents choose the name Fluffy because it is a pretty name, but Fluffy discovers that he is not at all fluffy and goes about trying various means to become fluffy. He tries to "be" a cloud and a pillow. He experiments with bubble bath, whipped cream, marshmallows, shaving cream and feathers, and even a bunny outfit, but nothing works. He is very dejected and becomes greatly embarrassed when he runs into a rhinoceros who teases him and laughs at his name. But after Fluffy discovers that the rhinoceros is named Hippo, he laughs as well, and the two become fast friends. This story touches on the idea of opposites as well as providing numerous sensory experiences.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • A Rainbow of Friends

    by P.K. Hallinan Year Published: Easy Reading
    A Rainbow of Friends is a book that encourages children to accept and support each other regardless of differences. Through a poem illustrated with cartoon depictions of children, the book points out how each child is special regardless of color, ability, interests, talents, dress, and other differences. The book helps sensitize children to the fact that each of us has something to contribute. This book can also help children understand that although we may move, talk, think, see, look, and hear differently, if we care about and help one another, we can accomplish many things.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • A Wish to be a Christmas Tree

    by Colleen Monroe Year Published: Average
    A tall, lonely tree waits at the edge of the Christmas tree farm. Every year, families come and go, as he grows taller and taller, until he's sure that his days of being someone's Christmas tree are over. This charming story will remind you of the power of friendship as a squirrel, birds, deer, and other woodland creatures help to make an overgrown tree's Christmas wish finally come true. This is a charming story with amazing illustrations.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Abiyoyo

    by Pete Seeger Year Published: Average

    Abiyoyo is a story song based on a South African lullaby and folk story. It is a retelling of a traditional folktale about a small boy who plays a ukulele; his father, who possesses a mysterious magic wand; and a terribly dirty giant named Abiyoyo. The villagers, growing tired of the boy's ukulele and the father's magic tricks, chase them to the outskirts of town. They live, "ostracized," until the day Abiyoyo appears in the pasture. Nothing can stop the giant except for the enchanting sound of the ukulele and the mysterious power of the magic wand. Children love to sing along to this story and help make the sounds of the magical wand. This is one of our 4K students favorite stories.

     

    Note: This book is available in our Library.

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  • First Flight

    by David McPhail Year Published: Average
    First Flight is the story of a young boy who is taking his first flight to visit his grandma. His parents take him to the airport where he and his teddy bear get his ticket, find his gate, go through security and watch the plane get ready. Once on the plane, the teddy bear becomes a real bear companion sitting next to him, experiencing the same feelings and the same activities on the plane as the little boy. They put on their seat belts, look out the window, eat lunch, watch a movie, go to the bathroom, experience turbulence in a storm, and take a nap. They land safely and meet Grandma, and once again the bear becomes a stuffed teddy bear. The story provides opportunities to talk about feelings(especially how becoming more independent can be scary) and what can help people to feel safe.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Franklin Has a Sleepover

    by Paulette Bourgeois Year Published: Average
    This book provides an avenue for children to understand and cope with what it is like to have a sleepover. The story begins with Franklin, the turtle, inviting his friend Bear to spend the night. After much preparation, they decide to spend the night in a tent made from a tablecloth in the living room. They play, have a campfire outside, sing, roast marshmallows and hot dogs, and then set off to camp in the living room. After they crawl into their sleeping bags, Bear turns on his flashlight and tells his friend that he misses his room. They gather their sleeping bags and go into Franklin's room. Once again, Bear turns on his flashlight and tells his friend that his mother always tells his bunny good night. Franklin hugs the bunny, and they both fall asleep. The sleepover is a success, and Bear decides he wants to host the next one. This story allows children to explore their fears of sleeping away from home within the safe context of a story.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Friends

    by Helme Heine Year Published: Average
    Friends is a story about three farm animals: Charlie Rooster; Johnny Mouse; and Percy, a fat pig. Together these three friends have many different adventures, always deciding as a group what they will do next. They play Hide-and-Seek, pretend to be pirates, ride a bike, fish, and at the end of the day want to stay overnight together. After trying out each friend's sleeping area, the friends realize that they are unable to stay with each other at night. They discover that good friends stick together, make decisions together, and are fair; however, they realize that they can still be good friends even though they are not together all of the time. The story can spark discussion of how friends can look and be different from you, but they are still your friends.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Night Tree

    by Eve Bunting Year Published: Average
    Night Tree is a story that emphasizes not the holiday but rather giving and family traditions in an unusual and special way. Told by a young boy, the story unfolds as the family sets out to find "their" tree in the woods. They drive to Luke's Forest and walk through the woods with a box and a flashlight. When they arrive at their tree, they comment on how much it has grown since the previous year, and the parents note that their children have grown taller, too. They then unload their box an begin hanging popcorn strings, tangerines, apples, and seed balls on the tree. After sprinkling nuts and seeds under the tree, they lay a blanket on the ground and sit on it and drink hot chocolate as they admire their tree and sing songs. That night and the next day, the little boy imagines all of the forest animals enjoying the food on the tree and perhaps singing their own songs. The story had a warm message that will inspire both adults and children want to give to all living things.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Picking Apples and Pumpkins

    by Amy and Richard Hutchings Year Published: Average
    Picking Apples and Pumpkins-What a great way to spend the day! It's fun to pick apples! Take a hayride, climb up into the apple trees, and pick the apples you like best. Pick out a big orange pumpkin. Then go home, carve a Jack-o-lantern, and make apple pies. This story is a great way to lead into our fall unit that takes us on a field trip to Hermanson's Pumpkin Farm to pick our own pumpkins.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Somebody and the Three Blairs

    by Marilyn Tolhurst Year Published: Easy Reading

    Somebody and the Three Blairs is a humorous reversal of the story "Goldilocks and the Three Bears." The story includes the Blairs who decide to go to the park to feed the ducks after breakfast. While they are out, Somebody (a bear)comes into the house. He tries the breakfast food, which is "too dry" or "too noisy"; and the honey, which is "just right." Next, Somebody tries to find a place to sit. One chair is "too hard" another is "too wobbly," and the highchair is "just right." He then looks for something with which to play. The cans from the cupboard are "too noisy," boxes from the refrigerator are "too cold," but mixing up eggs and flour and other stuff from the kitchen is a game that feels "just right." Somebody keeps up his antics by trying to find water to drink and a place to sleep. When the Blairs return, they find a mess in every room. They speculate as to whether the intruder was a monster, a burglar, or an animal escaped from the zoo. In the meantime, Somebody escapes out the window and down the drainpipe. Baby Blair yells "bye-bye" and invites Somebody to come back and play. This story not only invites comparison to the original story of the Three Bears, it provides an opportunity to learn about the differences of small, medium, and large.

     

    Note: This book is available in our Library.

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  • The Kissing Hand

    by Audrey Penn Year Published: Average

    The Kissing Hand is a delightful story about overcoming the difficulty of leaving one's mother and home to go to school for the first time. Chester the raccoon is sad about having to leave all of his friends and toys to go to school at night. Chester's wise mother reassures him that he will make new friends and have fun with new toys, but she also shares with him a very old secret about the Kissing Hand She kisses Chester's hand in the middle of his palm and sends warm love throughout his body. She then tells him that whenever he feels lonely or needs love from home, he can presses his palm against his cheek and think, "Mommy loves you." The Kissing Hand helps Chester to understand that his mother's love can be with him always. He also learns that the Kissing Hand can be reciprocated so that his mother can always feel his love. This warm, loving story is a wonderful introduction to a new school year. It helps children cope with issues relating to separation while at the same time introducing all the fun activities at school.

     

    Note: This book is available in our Library.

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  • The Knight and the Dragon

    by Tomie DePaolo Year Published: Easy Reading
    The Knight and the Dragon is a magical tale of a dragon and knight who learn that it is much more fun to cook together than to fight against each other. At the beginning of the story, we meet the knight, who lives in a castle, and the dragon, who lives in a nearby cave. Both wonder what it would be like to fight the other, and they read books on this subject. They prepare for the fight; the knight makes armor, and the dragon practices swishing his tail. Eventually, they write to each other and set a time for the fight. The result of the battle, however, is that each hurts himself more than the other. Just as the battle is winding down, a princess with a traveling library stops to see them. She gives them each a cookbook, and they decide to open a restaurant together. This story provides the opportunity for children to think and talk about their own interactions with peers.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

    by Linda Williams Year Published: Average
    This is a book that fits nicely with Halloween. The story is about a little old lady who sets out to gather herbs, spices, seeds, and nuts from the forest. It is dark when she starts home. She soon discovers that she is being followed by a pair of shoes that go "clomp, clomp." She is not afraid but hurries on. Subsequently, she is followed by a pair of pants, a shirt, two gloves, a hat, and a scary pumpkin head, all of which make frightening noises. They chase her home and try again to scare her, but she is not to be frightened. Instead, she recommends that they stay in her garden and scare her crows away. This is a fun book for children because of the repetition of the sounds and actions that the various clothes and objects make as they follow the old lady. The children soon begin to remember the associated noises and can cheerfully render them as the story progresses.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Rainbow Fish

    by Marcus Pfister Year Published: Average
    The Rainbow Fish is a much-loved story about friendship, giving, differences, and beauty. Rainbow Fish was the most beautiful fish in the ocean. His scales were multicolored and among them were shimmering silver scales. Rainbow Fish did not play with the other fish, as he was too busy being admired. One day a little blue fish asked Rainbow Fish if he could have one of his beautiful silver scales. Rainbow Fish did not want to share his beauty with the little blue fish and so he told him that he could not have one of his special scales. The little blue fish told the other fish in the ocean how Rainbow Fish would not share. All of the fish in the ocean ignored Rainbow Fish, and he was sad and lonely. He sought advice from a variety of ocean creatures. Finally, on the advice of an octopus, he gave the little blue fish one of his scales. The act of giving provided him with more pleasure than keeping the scales. As a result, he gave away all but one of his scales. Ultimately he learned what it means to be a friend and was accepted by the other fish.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Snowy Day

    by Ezra Jack Keats Year Published: Easy Reading
    The Snowy Day is a simple story of a young African American boy named Peter who wakes up one morning and discovers that everything is covered with snow. Peter goes outside in the snow. He makes different kinds of tracks in the snow, hits a tree with a stick and knocks off the snow, watches a snowball fight between older boys, makes a snowman and snow angels, climbs a mountain of snow and slides down it, and puts a snowball in his pocket to save. His snowball does not last, but the next day there is even more snow, and he goes out with a friend to play again. This story is a great opportunity for our students to learn about what happens when we bring snow inside the classroom and what happens when we take water outside.
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  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff

    by Janet Stevens Year Published: Average
    The Three Billy Goats Gruff, retold and illustrated by Janet Stevens, is the familiar story of three brother goats who encounter a troll. The illustrations have been modernized with details that children will love. The Three Billy Goats Gruff is also a story about families sticking together and facing fear with courage. The three billy goats have run out of grass on their side of the valley and must cross a bridge to the other side. Under the bridge is a mean and scary troll, whom all three goats must face in order to cross the bridge. As the troll roars his challenge and threatens to eat each of the younger goats, they plead that their older brother is bigger and juicier than they are. This plea works for each of the younger two goats; when the eldest goat crosses, he meets the troll's challenge and "kicks, pokes, and scares" him away. The three billy goats are united on the far side of the bridge where they remain, eating sweet, green grass. This story can help children explore their own fears of things, real or imagined, as well as how other family members can help cope with fear.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Three Little Javelinas

    by Susan Lowell Year Published: Average
    The Three Little Javelinas is a new twist on an old tale. It is a Southwestern account of the traditional story about the Three Little Pigs. It is a delightful story about the Southwest area and celebrates the diverse cultures, traditions, and fables found there. The story begins by explaining that javelinas are "wild, hairy Southwestern cousins of pigs." The language is wonderfully descriptive. The javelinas in the story(two brothers and a sister) are off to seek their fortunes. They part ways, and one by one they build their houses in the Sonoran Desert. The first javelina gets caught in a dust storm and ends up in a pile of tumbleweeds that he uses to build his house. The second javelina meets a Native American woman who gives him some saguaro sticks to build a house. The third javelina encounters an adobe brick maker who speaks Spanish. He agrees to give her some bricks for a house. The antagonist of the story is the coyote of the Southwestern myths and legends. He is a magical being and in the true tradition of the story does a lot of huffing and puffing. Throughout the story, desert animals appear, disappear, and reappear. Dress is classically Southwestern.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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Pet Chicken